Posts tagged with ‘the more you know

Consciousness is at the core of our very existence. An intangible constant that underpins our experience of the world. But for centuries it has been the frustrating source of a seemingly impenetrable explanatory gap – it is largely a scientific mystery.

Is consciousness real? Could it be just an illusion manufactured in the theatre of our minds? And what use is it – why did it evolve in the first place? Professor Nicholas Humphrey explores the mystery.

Atoms as big as a mountain: Neutron stars explained

Neutron Stars are some of the most strangest things in the universe. Not quite massive enough to become black holes, they’re basically atoms as big as mountains with properties so extreme that it is mind-blowing. And if you get too close to a neutron star you are in big trouble…

This is what it looks like when you boil your GoPro just so you can see what it looks like to poach an egg in real time

This Japanese guy nearly destroyed his GoPro in the process, but for a worth cause.

Nineteenth century astronomers had it right, 20th century got it wrong and it drastically delayed the search for exoplanets

While space based telescopes such as Hubble and Kepler have become really, really damn good at finding exoplanets now that we know what we’re looking for, there was a point in the early 20th century when scientists thought our planet-rich solar system was a total fluke, and it was likely there weren’t many other planets at all in the solar system. Problem is, this overturned 19th century ideas of planetary formation that were right all along, and would have begun the search for exoplanets much earlier. Nineteenth century astronomers believed solar systems formed in gaseous nebulae, but in the 20th century, the idea became popular that our solar system was a freak, and that all the stuff from the other bodies in it was due to another star passing too close to the sun, causing the sun to eject out all kinds of junk that became the planets and moons, and that such an event was probably extremely unlikely to happen in any other cases, if at all.

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The World’s Smallest Movie: A Boy And His Atom

IBM researchers used a scanning tunneling microscope to move thousands of carbon monoxide molecules (two atoms stacked on top of each other), all in pursuit of making a movie so small it can be seen only when you magnify it 100 million times.

ESO Antenna TimeLapse
The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a revolutionary instrument in its scientific concept, its engineering design, and its organization as a global scientific endeavor.
Thanks to its high resolution and sensitivity, ALMA will open an entirely new “window” on the Universe, allowing scientists to unravel longstanding and important astronomical mysteries, in search of our Cosmic Origins.
Via ALMA Observatory & ESO

ESO Antenna TimeLapse

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a revolutionary instrument in its scientific concept, its engineering design, and its organization as a global scientific endeavor.

Thanks to its high resolution and sensitivity, ALMA will open an entirely new “window” on the Universe, allowing scientists to unravel longstanding and important astronomical mysteries, in search of our Cosmic Origins.

Via ALMA Observatory & ESO

(Source: afro-dominicano)

Iranian is the first woman to win mathematic’s Fields Medal. Score another math victory for Persia.

During the Golden Age of the Persian Empire, Iran was an unstoppable font of mathematical and scientific discovery and progress. And even though she had to move from Tehran to the US to fully pursue her goals, Iranian mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani became the first woman to win the Fields Medal, mathematic’s equivalent of the Nobel Prize. Mirzakhani was awarded the medal for her work in understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces.

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Check out the trailer for ‘The Theory of Everything’, the story of Stephen Hawking

Starring Eddie Redmayne (“Les Misérables”) and Felicity Jones (“The Amazing Spider-Man 2”), this is the extraordinary story of one of the world’s greatest living minds, the renowned astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, who falls deeply in love with fellow Cambridge student Jane Wilde. Once a healthy, active young man, Hawking received an earth-shattering diagnosis at 21 years of age. With Jane fighting tirelessly by his side, Stephen embarks on his most ambitious scientific work, studying the very thing he now has precious little of – time. Together, they defy impossible odds, breaking new ground in medicine and science, and achieving more than they could ever have dreamed. The film is based on the memoir Travelling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen, by Jane Hawking, and is directed by Academy Award winner James Marsh (“Man on Wire”).

Scientists at MIT were able to recover voice and other audio just from a silent video of a bag of chips and some leaves

By analyzing the nigh imperceptible vibrations of leaves and a bag of potato chips, scientists at MIT were able to reconstruct intelligible audio from 15 feet away. All those sound waves bouncing around from the conversation bounced off the chip bag and the leaves— something so minute, you might not think it would be possible to reconstruct an entire conversation from, but they did.

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