Posts tagged with ‘space exploration

On June 14, SpaceX’s Grasshopper flew 325 m (1066 feet)–higher than Manhattan’s Chrysler Building–before smoothly landing back on the pad. For the first time in this test, Grasshopper made use of its full navigation sensor suite with the F9-R closed loop control flight algorithms to accomplish a precision landing. Most rockets are equipped with sensors to determine position, but these sensors are generally not accurate enough to accomplish the type of precision landing necessary with Grasshopper.

Japanese astronaut will be bringing a small talking robot into space. Don’t let it operate the pod bay doors.

When astronaut Koichi Wakada heads up to the International Space Station in August, he’ll have with him a little friend— a 13 inch tall robot named Kirobo. The robot will be able to carry on conversations with the astronauts on board to a certain extent. Or it, may gain self-awareness, realize the hopelessness of its predicament and murder everyone on board. Flip a coin.

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NASA’s new TESS satellite is a mean little exoplanet discovering machine

The Kepler Space Telescope has been a rock star when it comes to discovering exoplanets, but NASA has an even better exoplanet discovering machine in the works named TESS, or Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, built entirely around the mission of trying to discover even more planets across the universe.

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Website of the day: Distractions in Space
Distractions in Space has a good collection of transcripts of conversations between astronauts and ground control from various Apollo missions, including this one about a turd floating through the cabin during Apollo 10.
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Website of the day: Distractions in Space

Distractions in Space has a good collection of transcripts of conversations between astronauts and ground control from various Apollo missions, including this one about a turd floating through the cabin during Apollo 10.

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Voyager has more or less left the solar system

While NASA won’t say yet that Voyager I has officially left the solar system, because it’s kind of a wide, wobbly border, but as far as we know right now, the tiny little space probe that could has pretty much left the solar system, making it the first manmade object to do so.

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Jeff Bezos recovers an Apollo rocket from the bottom of the Atlantic

Amazon founder and space travel startup entrepreneur Jeff Bezos recently completed a fishing expedition in the Atlantic, where he managed to pull up an old, rusty rocket that had been sitting on the seafloor since 1969, when they were jettisoned from the rocket that took Neil Armstrong and co to the moon.

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SpaceX’s Grasshopper reusable rocket makes its second test hop, doubling its previous height

SpaceX’s Grasshopper doubled its highest leap to date to rise 24 stories or 80.1 meters (262.8 feet), hovering for approximately 34 seconds and landing safely using closed loop thrust vector and throttle control.

Meet the couple who could have the fortitude for a trip to Mars and back

Last month, billionaire Dennis Tito said that he wants to send a married couple on a trip around Mars and back, a journey of 500 days in a tiny tin can floating through space. For the mission, it can’t just be any couple— preferably, you’d want two people who have experience living in extreme isolation for long periods of time without killing each other. Rolf and Deborah Shapiro have done just that, having spent 15 months alone in Antarctica, just for the fuck of it.

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Billionaire wants to send a married couple around Mars starting in 2018. Yeah, that’ll work.

Billionaire space tourist guy Dennis Tito wants to help be one of the first people to launch people to Mars in 2018. Instead of a single person or a crew of several, Tito’s idea is to send a married couple in orbit around Mars, because being married is a guarantee that someone won’t get murdered when you’re stuck in a tin can for 500 days in space.

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A human trip to Mars could cause Alzheimer’s in astronauts

We’ve sent humans to the Moon several times, but that’s a pretty short journey. A human trip to our other nearest rocky neighbor Mars is quite a bit longer and presents a lot more problems with how people will handle the trip, physically, mentally and emotionally. One potential problem could be that the trip might induce Alzheimer’s in the astronauts, which is a big problem.

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Stop whatever you’re doing and watch this 25 tour of the International Space Station

Otherwise you won’t know how many kinds of toilet paper they have, or know why the exercise bike could potentially break their solar panels, or where the secret stash of space candy is. SPACE CANDY!

Photos taken by the Huygens probe as it was landing on the moon Titan
On January 14, 2005, the Huygens space probe landed on the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan (shown left). Organized as a joint mission by the Italian Space Agency, ESA and NASA, the Huygens’ touchdown marked the first spacecraft landing in the outer solar system and still remains the most distant landing of any craft launched from Earth to this day.
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Photos taken by the Huygens probe as it was landing on the moon Titan

On January 14, 2005, the Huygens space probe landed on the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan (shown left). Organized as a joint mission by the Italian Space Agency, ESA and NASA, the Huygens’ touchdown marked the first spacecraft landing in the outer solar system and still remains the most distant landing of any craft launched from Earth to this day.

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NASA’s Curiosity rover uses its brush to wipe a section of the Martian surface clean of dust
In order to try and get a certain amount of Martian soil samples as dust free as possible, Curiosity is equipped with a wire brush that scrubs red dust from rocks to get a better look at what’s underneath. A couple days ago, Curiosity tried its brush for the first time on a section of flat rock, and this is what that rock looks like under the red Martian soil.
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NASA’s Curiosity rover uses its brush to wipe a section of the Martian surface clean of dust

In order to try and get a certain amount of Martian soil samples as dust free as possible, Curiosity is equipped with a wire brush that scrubs red dust from rocks to get a better look at what’s underneath. A couple days ago, Curiosity tried its brush for the first time on a section of flat rock, and this is what that rock looks like under the red Martian soil.

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