Posts tagged with ‘saturn

NASA releases a gorgeous photo of Saturn, Earth, Venus and Mars all together in one shot
We’re teeny tiny dots compared to the majesty of Saturn, but there we are, the three little rocky inner planets just floating there in space.
NASA link for biggerness

NASA releases a gorgeous photo of Saturn, Earth, Venus and Mars all together in one shot

We’re teeny tiny dots compared to the majesty of Saturn, but there we are, the three little rocky inner planets just floating there in space.

NASA link for biggerness

The most gorgeous view of Saturn you’ll see in your lifetime
A composite created by Gordon Ugarkovic using images taken from the Cassini spacecraft
See it in mind-blowing full size here

The most gorgeous view of Saturn you’ll see in your lifetime

A composite created by Gordon Ugarkovic using images taken from the Cassini spacecraft

See it in mind-blowing full size here

Cassini’s new version of the “Pale Blue Dot”
As NASA’s Cassini space probe does its thing around Saturn, it turned around and snapped this gorgeous picture, similar to the Pale Blue Dot photo taken by Voyager 1 in 1990.
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Cassini’s new version of the “Pale Blue Dot”

As NASA’s Cassini space probe does its thing around Saturn, it turned around and snapped this gorgeous picture, similar to the Pale Blue Dot photo taken by Voyager 1 in 1990.

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Photos taken by the Huygens probe as it was landing on the moon Titan
On January 14, 2005, the Huygens space probe landed on the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan (shown left). Organized as a joint mission by the Italian Space Agency, ESA and NASA, the Huygens’ touchdown marked the first spacecraft landing in the outer solar system and still remains the most distant landing of any craft launched from Earth to this day.
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Photos taken by the Huygens probe as it was landing on the moon Titan

On January 14, 2005, the Huygens space probe landed on the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan (shown left). Organized as a joint mission by the Italian Space Agency, ESA and NASA, the Huygens’ touchdown marked the first spacecraft landing in the outer solar system and still remains the most distant landing of any craft launched from Earth to this day.

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Check out this stunning photo of a backlit Saturn, taken by the Cassini probe
On Oct. 17, 2012, during its 174th orbit around the gas giant, Cassini was deliberately positioned within Saturn’s shadow, a perfect location from which to look in the direction of the sun and take a backlit view of the rings and the dark side of the planet. Looking back towards the sun is a geometry referred to by planetary scientists as “high solar phase;” near the center of your target’s shadow is the highest phase possible. This is a very scientifically advantageous and coveted viewing position, as it can reveal details about both the rings and atmosphere that cannot be seen in lower solar phase.
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Check out this stunning photo of a backlit Saturn, taken by the Cassini probe

On Oct. 17, 2012, during its 174th orbit around the gas giant, Cassini was deliberately positioned within Saturn’s shadow, a perfect location from which to look in the direction of the sun and take a backlit view of the rings and the dark side of the planet. Looking back towards the sun is a geometry referred to by planetary scientists as “high solar phase;” near the center of your target’s shadow is the highest phase possible. This is a very scientifically advantageous and coveted viewing position, as it can reveal details about both the rings and atmosphere that cannot be seen in lower solar phase.

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Crazy image of the gigantic swirling vortex over Saturn’s north pole
Being a gas giant, Saturn is full of storms. But the most impressive of all is the massive raging vortex at Saturn’s north pole. Taken from NASA’s Cassini probe.
More photos here

Crazy image of the gigantic swirling vortex over Saturn’s north pole

Being a gas giant, Saturn is full of storms. But the most impressive of all is the massive raging vortex at Saturn’s north pole. Taken from NASA’s Cassini probe.

More photos here

Swirling vortex over Titan’s south pole means WINTER IS COMING

The above image was taken by the Cassini space probe of the south pole of Titan, one of Saturn’s largest moons. The swirling vortex is a mixture of gases, an indication that it’s almost winter on Titan.

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Saturn’s moon Titan is found to have an equator full of tropical methane lakes

The more we learn about the many moons of the gas giants in our solar system, the more we learn that they’re often more fascinating than the planets they orbit. Titan, a moon that orbits Saturn, has always been of great interest to science, and it just keeps getting more interesting. It turns out that along Titan’s equator, there are a number of large, tropical methane lakes. Not exactly vacation spots, but fascinating nonetheless. 

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What Earth would look like if it had rings like Saturn

This video is from 2009 and it might be a repost, but it’s worth reposting if it is. Beyond just thinking about how cool it would be to see Earth from a distance if we had thick Saturnian rings, it’s fascinating to imagine how human civilization and mythology would have been incredibly different with rings in the sky.

Saturn’s moon Dione is enveloped in a cozy layer of oxygen

The moons of Jupiter and Saturn continue to yield surprises the more we get a chance to thoroughly investigate them. The newest fun find is on Dione, one of the moons of Saturn, where scientists discovered that the body is enveloped in life-giving oxygen.

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The most gorgeous photo of Saturn’s moon Enceladus yet
Taken in January of last year, this is probably the best image you’ll ever see of Enceladus, not just because of the detail, but because the moon was positioned just so that Saturn gave it just enough shadow to provide detail. Normally, the icy moon of Enceladus would be bright white.
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The most gorgeous photo of Saturn’s moon Enceladus yet

Taken in January of last year, this is probably the best image you’ll ever see of Enceladus, not just because of the detail, but because the moon was positioned just so that Saturn gave it just enough shadow to provide detail. Normally, the icy moon of Enceladus would be bright white.

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Awesome unmanned airplane mission to Titan delayed until at least 2020

Saturn’s moon Titan appears to be an amazing place, one that scientists are eager to check out. Since Titan has a thick enough atmosphere, it’s possible to explore the moon by plane rather than land rover, but the plan to send an unmanned plane to Titan has sadly been put off until at least 2020.

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Gorgeous photo of Titan and its sister moon Dionne, taken from the Cassini spacecraft
This breathtaking image is actually a composite of the most recent photos sent back from Cassini as it travels around Saturn and its moons.
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Gorgeous photo of Titan and its sister moon Dionne, taken from the Cassini spacecraft

This breathtaking image is actually a composite of the most recent photos sent back from Cassini as it travels around Saturn and its moons.

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Saturn’s moon Enceladus appears to be covered in a fine layer of snow. SKI TRIP!
Saturn’s moon Enceladus appears to be cloaked in drifts of powdery snow around 330 feet (100 meters) thick, scientists announced this week.  The researchers think superfine snowflakes are blasted out of geyser-like jets, which emanate from long fissures called tiger stripes on the moon’s southern hemisphere. Some of the snow from these plumes falls back to the moon’s surface, coating older fractures and craters in a slow process of accumulation.  “The particles are only a fraction of a millimeter in size … even finer than talcum powder,” study leader Paul Schenk, a planetary scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas, said in a statement. “This would make for the finest powder a skier could hope for.”
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Saturn’s moon Enceladus appears to be covered in a fine layer of snow. SKI TRIP!

Saturn’s moon Enceladus appears to be cloaked in drifts of powdery snow around 330 feet (100 meters) thick, scientists announced this week.

The researchers think superfine snowflakes are blasted out of geyser-like jets, which emanate from long fissures called tiger stripes on the moon’s southern hemisphere. Some of the snow from these plumes falls back to the moon’s surface, coating older fractures and craters in a slow process of accumulation.

“The particles are only a fraction of a millimeter in size … even finer than talcum powder,” study leader Paul Schenk, a planetary scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas, said in a statement. “This would make for the finest powder a skier could hope for.”

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