Posts tagged with ‘engineering

Physicists now believe that a perpetual motion machine is possible

For centuries and centuries, people have tried to build or conceive of a perpetual motion machine, but science keeps telling us that such a thing isn’t possible. Now, some scientists seem to think it may be possible after all.

Read more »

Know your awesome engineers of history: Charles Proteus Steinmetz
The great mathematician and engineer Charles Proteus Steinmetz, a contemporary of Albert Einstein, Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison stood only four feet tall and was crippled and bent by kyphosis but was a giant in his field. One day, when Henry Ford’s, electrical engineers couldn’t solve a problems they were having with a gigant generator,Ford called Steinmetz. Upon arriving, Steinmetz rejected all assistance and asked only for a notebook, pencil and cot. Steinmetz listened to the generator and scribbled computations on the notepad for two straight days and nights. On the second night, he asked for a ladder, climbed up the generator and made a chalk mark on its side. Then he told Ford’s skeptical engineers to remove a plate at the mark and replace sixteen windings from the field coil. They did, and the generator performed to perfection.Henry Ford was thrilled until he got an invoice in the amount of $10,000. Ford acknowledged Steinmetz’s success but balked at the figure. He asked for an itemized bill.
Steinmetz responded personally to Ford’s request with the following:Making chalk mark on generator $1.
Knowing where to make mark $9,999.
Ford paid the bill.

Know your awesome engineers of history: Charles Proteus Steinmetz

The great mathematician and engineer Charles Proteus Steinmetz, a contemporary of Albert Einstein, Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison stood only four feet tall and was crippled and bent by kyphosis but was a giant in his field. One day, when Henry Ford’s, electrical engineers couldn’t solve a problems they were having with a gigant generator,Ford called Steinmetz. Upon arriving, Steinmetz rejected all assistance and asked only for a notebook, pencil and cot. Steinmetz listened to the generator and scribbled computations on the notepad for two straight days and nights. On the second night, he asked for a ladder, climbed up the generator and made a chalk mark on its side. Then he told Ford’s skeptical engineers to remove a plate at the mark and replace sixteen windings from the field coil. They did, and the generator performed to perfection.
Henry Ford was thrilled until he got an invoice in the amount of $10,000. Ford acknowledged Steinmetz’s success but balked at the figure. He asked for an itemized bill.

Steinmetz responded personally to Ford’s request with the following:
Making chalk mark on generator $1.

Knowing where to make mark $9,999.

Ford paid the bill.

How tall can you build a Lego tower before it crushes itself?

In the last few years, there have been some pretty tall Lego towers built, each one claiming the title of “world’s tallest”. How tall could you build a Lego tower before it’s crushed under it’s own weight? Pretty damn tall, actually. If you’re talking 2x2 bricks, you could get a tower over two miles high before the bottom Lego is destroyed.

Read more »

Need something awesome to watch? Check out this episode of Richard Hammond’s Engineering Connections

In this episode of Engineering Connections, Richard Hammond traces the technology, through the ages, that eventually came together to make an F1 racing car.

Submitted by Delsyd

The world’s tiniest electric motor is only one molecule wide

Nanoscience has gotten the art of making microscopic motors down pretty well, but the previous record holder was a motor 200 nanometers across (a human hair is about 60,000 nanometers wide). This new electric motor, created by chemical engineers at Tufts University is only 1 nanometer wide, consisting of a single custom-built molecule.

Read more »

Another day, another guy with an idea about how Stonehenge was built. Only this one makes quite a lot of sense

It seems every few months, some backyard historian or engineer comes up with some new idea of how ancient Britons moved gigantic stones into place with primitive technology. Usually these range from pretty out there and highly unlikely to “maybe, but it still sounds stupid”. But Gary Lavin, an engineer and former BBC presenter thinks he’s nailed it— they moved the stones to the site in giant wicker baskets.

Read more »






All profits from the sale of IHC T-shirts and stickers are donated to charity.
This month's charity is Kiva, and you can help by joining the IHC lending team.






See all IHC Reviews here

Want to submit a review for IHC and make a few bucks?
Please drop us a line and let us know what movie, game, book or TV show you want to review and we'll hold your spot. See full review guidelines here.