Posts tagged with ‘audio

New malware can jump air gaps from computer to computer using sound waves

Right now, the only way malware or any other chunk of computer code can get from one machine to the other is through wires of some sort. But scientists in Germany have discovered they could transmit small amounts of data small distances through empty air using high pitched inaudible sound waves. This experiment can be used to get a step ahead of future hackers who might be able to exploit your computer’s built-in microphone and speakers to receive and transmit data without plugging anything up to anything else. 

Read more here

The original Doctor Who theme song, slowed down to twenty minutes of creepiness

When people were on a kick of slowing familiar songs waaaaay the fuck down last year, one that was overlooked was the Doctor Who theme. Already a cool and creepy tune, when you draw it out to 20 minutes, it’s like the soundtrack to a Salvador Dali nightmare.

Found by Delsyd

James Joyce reads from ‘Ulysses’ from 1924

As Open Culture explains, this rare 1924 recording of Joyce reading from the Aeolus episode of the novel was arranged and financed by his friend and publisher Sylvia Beach, who brought him by taxi to the HMV (His Master’s Voice) gramophone studio in the Paris suburb of Billancourt. She writes in her memoir, Shakespeare & Company:

Joyce had chosen the speech in the Aeolus episode, the only passage that could be lifted out of Ulysses, he said, and the only one that was “declamatory” and therefore suitable for recital. He had made up his mind, he told me, that this would be his only reading from Ulysses.

I have an idea that it was not for declamatory reasons alone that he chose this passage from Aeolus. I believe that it expressed something he wanted said and preserved in his own voice. As it rings out–”he lifted his voice above it boldly”–it is more, one feels, than mere oratory.

Pair with these rare 1935 illustrations for Ulysses by none other than Henri Matisse

This is what it sounds like all the time inside the International Space Station

Astronaut Chris Hadfield, who may I remind you, is the first astronaut to record a song in outer space also used his recording equipment to capture the ambient sounds that are always going on inside the ISS. It’s very loud, and it’s one reason that sleep deprivation is such a problem up there… you’re pretty much living inside a small tin can of an engine that’s keeping you alive, and all that machinery isn’t quiet.

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Earliest known home audio recording of a Christmas celebration, from 1902, found and digitized

The 24 two-minute recordings are believed to include the earliest surviving audio of Christmas time in the UK, if not the world. They were found on wax cylinders belonging to the descendants of the Wall family who recorded many of their Christmas and New Year gatherings on a phonograph machine between 1902 and 1917.

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The oldest known record re-created from a single printed photograph

Patrick Feaster, a sound historian at Indiana University specializes in bringing really old audio recordings back to life. His latest feat was bringing back an audio recording from around 1889 recorded by Emile Berliner. The record no longer exists, but Feaster was able to reconstruct the record using nothing but an old photograph of the record from 1890.

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Listen to the earliest audio recording of an American president

In 1889, President Benjamin Harrison made what is thought to be the earliest audio recording of an American president. It was recorded on an Edison wax cylinder, so the audio quality isn’t that great, but it is what it is.

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Remember that gigantic storm on Saturn? This is what it sounds like

In addition to getting some awesome fucking photos of a giant storm raging across the face of Saturn, NASA’s Cassini probe also got audio of the event. Now I’ll tell you ahead of time that it’s not terribly impressive. It sounds just kind of like random static, but what you’re listening to is a whole shitload of lightning on a planet on the other side of the solar system, so that’s just cool enough as it is.

Listen here

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Morning metal: “Live As Though You’ll Die Today” by Bleoag

IHC’s resident metalsmith, Bleoag has a new track for you guys. He says: “I wanted to make an old 80’s thrash metal song that would pay homage to the metal bands of that era, AKA Anthrax/Slayer. I can’t really shred like they do but I give it a try.”

You can also download the mp3 here

CBZ shows up a second time on the Nerdbastards.com podcast

Somehow I went and got myself re-invited to the Nerdbastards podcast, which is always a fantastic time. We talked about Patton Oswalt and geek culture, Uncharted 2, Kevin Smith and more. Oh, and pie. Oh, and we talked about fucking double cheeseburgers. And I did it all while leveling my goblin rogue in WoW. MULTITASKING.

Listen to the Nerdbastardscast here

If you’re interested in expensive audio cables, you also probably like balls
Amazon, you’re so damn helpful.
Via

If you’re interested in expensive audio cables, you also probably like balls

Amazon, you’re so damn helpful.

Via

Short Film of the Day: “Dictaphone Parcel”

In Laura Warsta’s award-winning short, a dictaphone is placed inside a package, turned on, and shipped from London to Helsinki to record the sounds of the package’s journey across Europe.

(Source: thedailywh.at)

309 plays

Bleoag’s Monday Metal Moment of Zen: “Nihilist”

IHCer Bleog has a new track that he’s composed for your enjoyment called “Nihilist”. Bleoag sez: “The Speaker is Alan Watts, a zen master from the 70’s, and he is a smart dude. Zen moments are hard to get in metal and don’t show up often, but this is one of them.”

You can download this mp3 and more of Bleog’s stuff here. Oh, and how’s that IHC music collab coming?

Listening to the Perseids meteor shower

Like me, I’m sure many of you attempted a glimpse at the meteor shower which had its’ peak activity last weekend. What I didn’t know before then is that not only can you detect this display visually, but audio signals can be picked up as the meteoroids streak by. The results are as fascinating as they are eerie.

From spaceweather.com:

Meteor showers happen when tiny bits of debris from comets (and sometimes asteroids) strike Earth’s atmosphere and disintegrate. Fast-moving meteoroids ionize the air in their path and they leave behind a trail that can briefly reflect radio waves from TV stations, RADAR facilities, or AM/FM transmitters. A “radio meteor” is the short-lived echo of a radio signal that bounces off such a trail.

Also from spaceweather, referencing the attached link:

Astronomer-engineer Stan Nelson operates a 67 MHz forward-scatter meteor radar in Roswell, NM — identical to the one at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. On August 12, 2001, Stan captured this eerie-sounding echo of a Perseid meteor.

I’ve been told you can pick up the sounds with a radio tuned between stations. We didn’t have one with us this time, but I’ll make a point to try it for the next event.






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