Posts tagged with ‘ancient rome

Preserved loaf of bread found in the ruins of Pompeii
A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)
(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

Preserved loaf of bread found in the ruins of Pompeii

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond)

Scientists discover the ancient Roman secret of indestructible concrete

While we do most things much better than we did a couple thousand years ago, concrete is not one of them. The ancient Romans invented concrete, and their secret concret recipe has not been bettered by anyone ever in terms of longevity. But now we know their secret.

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discovery:

Archeologists just uncovered Plutonium, the Greco-Roman “gateway to hell”. Learn more about this incredible historical discovery, here - http://bit.ly/ZsUWjx

discovery:

Archeologists just uncovered Plutonium, the Greco-Roman “gateway to hell”. Learn more about this incredible historical discovery, here - http://bit.ly/ZsUWjx

Archaeologists unveil the world’s oldest D20
Romans may have used 20-Sided die almost two millennia before D&D, but people in ancient Egypt were casting icosahedra even earlier. Pictured above is a twenty-faced die dating from somewhere between 304 and 30 B.C., a timespan also known as Egypt’s Ptolemaic Period.
Via

Archaeologists unveil the world’s oldest D20

Romans may have used 20-Sided die almost two millennia before D&D, but people in ancient Egypt were casting icosahedra even earlier. Pictured above is a twenty-faced die dating from somewhere between 304 and 30 B.C., a timespan also known as Egypt’s Ptolemaic Period.

Via

Ancient Roman penises with wings discovered in Britain
Using metal detectors, these objects dating back 1,600-2,000 years were dug up and recently published in the journal Britannia. Aside from statues of alleged Emperor lover, gold and silver brooches and trinkets of various sorts, there are these carved bone phalluses, with finely detailed wings.
Via

Ancient Roman penises with wings discovered in Britain

Using metal detectors, these objects dating back 1,600-2,000 years were dug up and recently published in the journal Britannia. Aside from statues of alleged Emperor lover, gold and silver brooches and trinkets of various sorts, there are these carved bone phalluses, with finely detailed wings.

Via

The lewd graffiti of ancient Pompeii

Thanks to the volcanic ash that destroyed the city of Pompeii nearly overnight, modern archaeologists have been given a very preserved look at the lives of the people of ancient Rome, and that includes some of the lewd graffiti that in other places has long since been washed away.

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Rare ancient statue depicts a topless female gladiator

A small bronze statue dating back nearly 2,000 years may be that of a female gladiator, a victorious one at that, suggests a new study. If this is the case, it would only be the second known depiction of a female gladiator.

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Epic “Modern Marines vs. Ancient Romans” discussion on Reddit is being turned into a movie

Several months ago, we posted a link to a really epic discussion on Reddit, where someone asked the question “Could a battalion of modern Marines take down the entire Roman empire under Augustus?”, and one Redditor by the name of Prufrock created a gorgeous tale of a hard fought battle. And now that thread is being turned into a movie.

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Could I destroy the entire Roman Empire during the reign of Augustus if I traveled back in time with a modern U.S. Marine infantry battalion or MEU?

This would have been a great daily discussion question had I thought of it, but I didn’t think of it. It was Redditer The_Quiet_Earth that thought of it, and it turned out to be a really interesting discussion, mainly to due a Redditer named Prufrock451 (any Farkers know if this is the same Prufrock that used to do Fark PS contests a lot a few years ago?).

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This was the ancient Roman equivalent of the Swiss army knife
The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, UK, holds a Roman multitool that dates back to the 3rd Century C.E. When unfolded, it has a fork, spatula, pick, spike, and knife blade.
Fitzwilliam Museum via Neatorama

This was the ancient Roman equivalent of the Swiss army knife

The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, UK, holds a Roman multitool that dates back to the 3rd Century C.E. When unfolded, it has a fork, spatula, pick, spike, and knife blade.

Fitzwilliam Museum via Neatorama

Ancient Roman helmet sells for $3.6 million at auction

This ancient Roman helmet, discovered by a guy with a metal detector in Crosby Garrett, just south of the Scottish border recently fetched $3.6 million at auction at Christie’s in London. The helmet, complete with facemask has been described as a near-perfect example of Roman metalwork at its zenith.

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